Lifelong learning

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy

~ Hamlet by William Shakespeare 

Tandem Skydiving

Life long learning

Why learning

You have survived with what you know, so why should you learn more?

Learning can be great for mental agility and keeping your brain age young, staying positive, improving your social life and of course if you are learning a sport or fitness, like yoga or dance, then it can keep you fit too.

Approaches to learning

Reading

There are lots of ways to approach learning. Possibly the easiest (and laziest) is to read, perhaps a good start might be reading a book which you enjoyed years ago and would read with fresh eyes.

There are lots of resources for getting more reading material. If you have a library near you then you should be able to take out books for free. Some library services also ‘lend’ ebooks through apps that you can get on a smartphone, tablet or iPad. These can even be audio books which are read aloud to you so if reading is difficult for whatever reason you can still enjoy literature.

If you are registered blind it could be worth exploring the free talking books service from the RNIB whilst others who have difficulty reading due to illness, disability, learning or mental health difficulty can get audio books (streamed, downloadable or on CD) from the listening books charity which has annual memberships from as little as £20.

Listening books also cover lots of curriculum books which could make studying for qualifications possible for some.

Reading groups are a great way of meeting people and introducing you to new books.

The Internet

The Internet can be great for finding out about new things. To find out about things you never knew you never knew, TED Talks can be amazing, RSA Animate have a fascinating way of representing serious subjects through cartoons and there are many more opportunities. Youtube and other sites have a vast amount of material but suffer from not being curated and so it can be difficult to find the needle in the haystack.

Saying ‘Yes’ to new things

When opportunities arise do you take the adventurous option?

Unless there is a good reason not to, try saying ‘yes’.

Get in touch with your local council or Tourist Information Office and get listings of what is going on.

You could also contact Museums, Heritage sites, historical and other local societies. There are online sites that will tell you about formal and informal groups that are happening near you.

Meet-up.com is very handy, and some of the groups are for no other purpose than to create community, for instance in my town there is a group for people who are new in the area to meet once a month with no other requirements.

If you are of retirement age or above then U3A (University of the Third Age) is great for doing things with like minded people in your vicinity. It is set up as a cooperative for learning, exercising, community and whatever the local members want to do.

Talks & lectures

You can explore things you didn’t realise existed. Sometimes they will be boring, sometimes fascinating but nearly always engaging and may open new areas to you.

The next section looks at Engaging with the world.

Healthy Active Ageing

This blog post is an excerpt from Healthy Active Ageing, a series of mini-guides that together cover most of what we can do as human beings to make the later stages of our lives as positive as they can be.
If you complete the details below we’ll email you one of the guides every until you have the full set. You will know a lot of the information but there is nothing wrong with a reminder every now and then; and there may even be some information which is new to you.

 

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