Eating well – more tips

Food Table Celebration Delicious Party Meal Concept

“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well”

~ Virginia Woolf, A room of one’s own

Further to our previous post here are some rules of thumb to judge your diet against.

  • Eat a wide range of foods
    Ensure that you’re getting a balanced diet and that your body is receiving all the nutrients it needs.
  • Base your meals on rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and cereals.
    Try to keep it unprocessed by choosing wholegrain varieties – and don’t peel your potatoes.
  • Have lots of fruit and veg
    Try smoothies, augment cereals or porridge with a chopped banana, swap a treat for a piece of fruit.
  • Fish is a generally healthy option
    having a couple of portions of fish a week is good. At least one of these should an ‘oily’ fish such as salmon, mackerel, trout, herring or sardines
  • Cut down on saturated fat and sugar
    We are all aware that these are bad for us but you need to be careful about what is in processed food. Sometimes food and drinks have large amounts of sugar that you would not expect . Check everything but especially look out for fruit juices, spaghetti sauces, soups and breakfast cereals.
  • Eat less salt
    Two tips here.
    Firstly try ‘low-salt’, it is a much healthier option when adding salt to food that you are preparing. Most people get on with it very well as a direct replacement for salt but for a small minority it will taste more bitter than salty.
    Secondly, check your processed foods. Pizzas, pasta sauces, table sauces (ketchup, etc) and processed meats can all be culprits but they do have to state the salt content on the label.
  • Drink (mainly water)
    Aim for 6-8 glasses a day and whilst all non-alcoholic drinks help, water is about the best. You should also have no more than 150ml (just under half a drinks can) of juice or smoothie.
    Dehydration, not having enough fluid intake, can lead to confusion and balance issues amongst other symptoms.
  • Get a good cookbook.
    Not everyone likes cooking but there are ways to make food tasty without using so much salt and fat.

The NHS has a free downloadable ‘Eatwell guide’ at www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/the-eatwell-guide/.

Next are 5 top tips to managing your medication.


If you have a critical issue bothering you, click here for some information about what you can do now.


How to get the latest Health Active Ageing

If you are looking for some regular handy tips to help keep you shipshape, you have some choices:

  1. The simplest is to fill in your details below and click on the ‘Get Healthy Active Ageing’ button
  2. Bookmark our blogs and visit is regularly, you will be able to navigate through all our posts
  3. Follow us on Facebook

Eating well

Creative landscape made with assorted organic vegetables.

“Everything in moderation, including moderation.”

   ~  Oscar Wilde

As with all aspects of this guide bear in mind it is general guidance. If you are aware of an intolerance or allergy, or have taken professional dietary advice that has priority over any of the following.

Cooking and eating should be a pleasure and not a chore. Consider exploring some of the wide variety of food on offer in supermarkets, local shops and markets, or even from an allotment. The Web is full of recipes you can try.

Balance is everything

  • Eat a wide range of foods to ensure that you’re getting a balanced diet and that your body is receiving all the nutrients it needs.
  • Base your meals on rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and cereals. Try to keep it unprocessed by choosing wholegrain varieties and don’t peel your potatoes.
  •  Have lots of fruit and veg, drink smoothies, augment cereals or porridge with a chopped banana, swap a treat for a piece of fruit.

    Here’s a trick to try which might help you to be tempted by some of the things which are better for you.
    1. Sit comfortably.
    2. Close your eyes and imagine your favourite snack just in front of you, easily within reach and think which hand you would naturally pick it up with. Just consider how you see it, anticipate the taste and sensation it will give you.
    3. Now in your other hand picture an item of fruit which you know you should eat but don’t really like. Consider how you see that and how it doesn’t inspire you to want to eat it.
    4. Physically move the hand that you are holding the fruit in around your back and pass your (imaginary) fruit into your other hand.
    5. Put the imaginary fruit down in place of the treat and pick up the treat and take it around your back and place it in the other hand to put it down where the fruit was in the first place.
    6. You might now find that you begin to see the fruit in a new way and it starts to give you the sensations you used to have about the treat. Your treat might become as anodyne as the fruit was to you before.

If you have a critical issue bothering you, click here for some information about what you can do now.


How to get the latest Health Active Ageing

If you are looking for some regular handy tips to help keep you shipshape, you have some choices:

  1. The simplest is to fill in your details below and click on the ‘Get Healthy Active Ageing’ button
  2. Bookmark our blogs and visit is regularly, you will be able to navigate through all our posts
  3. Follow us on Facebook

Are everyday tasks becoming more difficult?

 

Man crossing rickety string bridge.

When everything you do seems like a challenge maybe it is time to ask for help to make things easy again

If you are becoming less able to cope with everyday tasks, known professionally as ‘activities of daily living’ (ADLs), and you are having difficulty solving the problem yourself then you could look on reputable websites for guidance such as AgeUK or livingmadeeasy.org.uk which are both charities.

If you still have an unresolved issue you could speak with an Occupational Therapist (OT). OTs are not just for working life but have a mission to ‘overcome barriers preventing people from doing the activities (or occupations) that matter to them.’ OTs will be up to date with the latest aids and services that can make life more manageable.

You can ask your local council or doctor for an assessment, but you are likely to find yourself on a waiting list which can be quite substantial and any support will probably be means tested. If you can afford it, go to rcot.co.uk (website of the OT’s Royal College) and click ‘find an occupational therapist’.

Continue reading

Stopping drift into decline

Leaves showing the changing colors of the seasons.

A lot of the changes are so gradual that they don’t even qualify as news, or even as interesting: they’re so mundane that we just take them for granted. But history shows that it’s the mundane changes that are more important than the dramatic ‘newsworthy’ events.

~ Robert D Kaplan

A good way to make the gradual changes more perceptable is to record snapshots against a date and we have designed a checklist for you to download, print, record and keep.

You can dowload your one page simple health checklist by clicking here.

Continue reading

Have you checked your health recently?

Isn’t it funny how day by day nothing changes, but when we look back everything is different.

   ~ C S Lewis

Optometrist examines eyesight of woman
A regular eye exam

A child’s growth is far more noticeable if you don’t see them every day. Likewise a drift from energy and health is far more noticeable if you look at information which is separated by time. The imperceptible changes that happen every day become perceptible over time and once you have perceived a change, often you can do something about it.

Make sure you have the right checks scheduled

You should be seen by health professionals in the proper timescales.

Health checks with a GP

If you haven’t been seeing the doctor for any other reason which would

Continue reading

Setting SMART targets

In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.
~ Dwight D. Eisenhower

Having useful tools to help plan will helpo you to be able to find the words for what you want to do, after all a wise man once said

“If you can’t explain it to a six year old, you don’t understand it yourself.”
~ Albert Einstein

albert einstein. graffiti in st. petersburg russia

SMART targets help you to make the future more tangible and give a good framework to work too; people use different words to complete the acronym but we suggest using the following.

Continue reading

4 Tips on Planning Your Future

“Planning is bringing the future into the present so that you can do something about it now.”
~ Alan Lakein

Look for win-wins

Try looking for activities that achieve more than one of your objectives, for instance if you would like to get fitter and to save money, cycling will both improve your fitness and can save on transport costs. Likewise, if you are someone who would like to get fitter and also widen their social circle join a club rather than exercising alone.

Be curious

Every stage of our lives offers fresh opportunities. Whilst you might like to revisit old activities, how about exploring new ones?

Hare at the green forest

Stretch not stress

As a guideline look for activities which are going to stretch you in some way but not ones that will be stressful.

How do you eat an elephant?

One bite at a time. If what you want ultimately to achieve seems too big, break it into smaller chunks so that each one is manageable.

Continue reading

How am I Doing Today?

Recording health and wellbeing

By recording how our health and wellbeing is today we can see the direction (and speed) it is headed in in a few month’s time. Our handy chart is available for you to print out, keep and compare periodically.

“To get from A to B you have to take the first step, ideally in the right direction.”

Always compare!

Compare with where you are now and where you’d like to be to make the most of your journey but try not to compare with others.

Here are some questions to ask yourself which will help you define where you are now and decide where you’d like to be.

Be objective, when you can…

So much of life is subjective but there are some very powerful tools that will help you spot trends to help you remedy a situation before it becomes a crisis. For example

Continue reading

The importance of rest

(and a handy trick for getting to sleep)

Rest gives a solid base for both mental and physical health. Though people need differing amounts of rest and sleep it is important that you get enough for your needs.

“I love sleep. My life has the tendency to fall apart when I’m awake, you know?”
~ Ernest Hemingway

In theory you could find that you are sleeping well and have great mental and physical wellbeing without doing much else, but in practice rest is a foundation and some maintenance is likely to be needed on other parts of the structure.

TIP
Here is a handy method that you might find useful for getting to sleep:

Continue reading

The recipe for wellbeing

Like all recipes getting the right balance of ingredients is important for wellbeing. You may be limited by the ingredients available, but you can make the best of what you have.

“I do not stick to rules when cooking. I rely on my imagination.”
~ Akshay Kumar

Aim to be as fit as you can be to meet your life aims, both physically and mentally. For instance if you want to fly jet planes you may need to be at the peak of physical and mental fitness but being able to drive for half an hour won’t need such attention.

Look after your mental health.

The Mental Health Foundation found that two out of three people will experience mental health issues during their life, and at any time only around one in eight people score highly on all the positive aspects of mental wellbeing. Sometimes mental ill health may be in part due to behaviour you can easily change but some factors may need external help. This could be as simple as a vitamin D deficiency which is easily remedied or could be more complex.

Your mental wellbeing is fundamental to your overall wellbeing. It is an area that many people can feel embarrassed about. It may help to think ‘if my best friend told me they had my symptoms, what would I advise them to do’ and then treat yourself how you’d hope they’d treat themselves.


If you have a critical issue bothering you, click here for some information about what you can do now.


How to get the latest Health Active Ageing

If you are looking for some regular handy tips to help keep you shipshape, you have some choices:

  1. The simplest is to fill in your details below and click on the ‘Get Healthy Active Ageing’ button
  2. Bookmark our blogs and visit is regularly, you will be able to navigate through all our posts
  3. Follow us on Facebook

Continue reading

© Copyright Acticheck Ltd, 2021 | UK company registration: 08852416

If you know something is wrong then please contact an expert immediately.

Your doctor can help with medical problems, or if you are in an emotional crisis you could contact the Samaritans. You can call them free from any phone on 116 123, email jo@samaritans.org or you may have a branch near you that you can visit (see www.samaritans.org/branches).

If the cause of your crisis is feeling overwhelmed by a financial or legal issue then they may suggest a local legal centre or the Citizens Advice Bureau as a good first step to solving your issues.

There is a Spanish phrase that says ‘Where there is a will, there are many ways’. Just because what you have tried so far has not worked does not mean there is nothing else to try and these people are expert at finding the right solution in a crisis, and they care.